What temperature does water evaporate at?

Answer

There is not a specific temperature that water must be in order for it to evaporate. However, as temperature rises, evaporation typically increases because water molecules are moving more quickly. The faster they move, the more likely it is that they will break away from the pack and evaporate.

However, there are some circumstances that typically require water to be certain temperatures. For example, water freezes at 32 F or zero C. The boiling point of water is 212 F or 100 C. Though the Fahrenheit scale was popular through the mid-1970s in the English-speaking world, most countries have since begun using the Celsius scale.

Q&A Related to "What temperature does water evaporate at?"
Water will evaporate at any temperature above freezing (water temp) Evaporation has more to do with the air than the water itself.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_evaporation_temp...
The evaporating temperature of water depends on the amount of surface
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-the-evapora...
1. Add enough salt to your solution to effect a noticeable result. While the addition of any amount of hydrogen-binding particulate to a solution will raise the evaporation point
http://www.ehow.com/how_8611067_increase-evaporati...
Water evaporates even under freezing point as we know, here in Norway, when we dry clothes outside, in the snow. How fast water evoporates depend on two factors: The wind that tears
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200809...
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