When are the postal rates going up?

Answer

As of June 15, 2014, it is unknown when the next United States Postal Service rate increase may occur. The last increase occurred on Jan. 26, 2014, when the price of a first-class stamp for a one-ounce letter rose to 49 cents from 46 cents.

The last increase was deemed necessary due to the deteriorating financial state of the USPS in the face of postal reform legislation, increased public use of social media and email instead of mailings and the resulting decrease in stamp usage. The USPS increased the cost of a first class stamp from 45 cents to 46 cents in January 2013 and cited losses of about $25 million per day.

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