Where Did the Word Pantomime Come from?

Answer

The word pantomime comes from the Greek words 'Pan', which means all, and 'mimos', which translates as imitator. It was a popular form of entertainment in ancient Greece and later, Rome. Like theatre, it encompassed the genres of comedy, tragedy, and sex.
Q&A Related to "Where Did the Word Pantomime Come from"
The Latin word. pantomimus. was a mime actor, from Greek. panto. (all) and. mimus. (to mimic or copy)
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Etymology is the study of how words evolve over time - where and what languages words come from, how new words are formed, and how words function. You can find more information here
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Pantomime: Communication by means of gesture and facial expression: Some
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