Where Do Frogs Hibernate?

Answer

Frogs hibernate by burying themselves in the mud. Most frogs dig a hole that shields them from adverse weather conditions while others may hide under decaying logs and leaves as heat is produced in the process of decay. Hibernation causes a reduction in metabolic rate in order to conserve energy in the body.
Q&A Related to "Where Do Frogs Hibernate"
1. Fill a plastic container with dirt, peat moss, and vermiculite. Make sure the soil is moist. If it is dry, mix in a few tablespoons of water. 2. Drill about 10 holes into the lid
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During winter time/around October. Some can survive being frozen cause they are used to the cold! (but some don't!
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Generally the frogs will lay on the bottom of the pond during the winter. Gasses
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around here, one species, the spring peepers are spread out in the woods. on the warm days before the rains they make the peeping sound to let you know they are near. They'll keep
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1 Additional Answer
Frogs usually hibernate by swimming to the bottom of lakes and ponds during the cold winter months. Once at the bottom, they may burrow into the mud to keep from freezing. Other amphibians, such as the toad, hibernate on land, burrowing down as much as three-feet to stay below the freeze levels.
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Frogs hibernate to get away from the freezing winter temperatures. They normally hibernate in burrows or hide themselves in mud. Toads and frogs are cold-blooded ...
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