Where does the attention line go on an envelope?

Answer

The attention line on an envelope indicates the intended recipient of a letter. The United States Postal Service shows that the attention line should always go at the top of the address instructions. It might say "John H. Doe," for instance.

When sending mail to a residence, the attention line is followed by the street address. Then the line with the city, state and zip code comes last. For a business letter, the attention line is followed by a line with the company name, and then the same address information on the next two lines. The actual word "attention" doesn't need to be included.

Reference:
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ATTENTION LINES ALWAYS GO FIRST, BEFORE THE ACTUAL ADDRESS. This is not an actual address, just an example. I just graduated from College and that was my specialty area. Example:
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Make the first batch yourself. Materials for plushy toys are not that expensive, and the only necessary tool is a sewing machine. Once you have made the toys, you can go to stores
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Your name and adress goes on the corner, while the person yur sending it 2 will go in BIG lettrs on da center. Source(s) textbook.
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