Where does the energy for photosynthesis originate?

Answer

The energy required for photosynthesis comes from the sun as light energy; plants transform this light energy into chemical energy, or sugars. Plants perform this energy conversion using light, water, carbon dioxide and a green substance called chlorophyll. Photosynthesis takes place in a plant's leaves.

Sunlight includes the full range of colors in the light spectrum. The chlorophyll in plants absorbs the red and some of the blue light waves for use in photosynthesis, and the light waves that are not absorbed are reflected back, giving plants their green color. Another waste product of photosynthesis is oxygen, making plants crucial to the survival of humans.

Reference:
Q&A Related to "Where does the energy for photosynthesis originate..."
I would guess from water and nutrients.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Where_does_the_initial_e...
Light consists of streams of tiny wavelike particles called photons. The energy of a photon depends upon the wavelength of light - shorter wavelengths have higher energy than longer
http://www.ehow.com/info_8483848_absorbs-light-ene...
Photosynthesis energy comes from the sun.
http://www.chacha.com/question/where-does-the-ener...
The sunlight and its electrons being returned to chlorophyll in photosystem I to create ATP and those electrons also being used to reduce NADP+ to NADPH in photosystem II.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=201211...
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