Where Is the Water Table Located?

Answer

The water table is located below the ground's surface and could rise or fall depending on various factors. It can also be located hundreds of feet down the surface. Water tables are formed when groundwater water fills the aquifer.
2 Additional Answers
Ask.com Answer for: where is the water table located
Water is a naturally occuring substance covering more than 70% of the surface of the Earth, and is vital to all life forms.
Water table is located in the saturation zone. In this zone, the pressure of water is equal to the pressure of atmosphere. When water trickles down in soil from the surface, water fills the pores around the soil. At some point the soil becomes saturated and water can't trickle down further, is called saturation zone.
Q&A Related to "Where Is the Water Table Located"
Water Table refers to level of water under ground. Where water table is high, water can be easily extracted from earth by Boring. High water table is also good for strength of soil.
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at the top of the zone of saturation.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Where_is_the_water_table...
1. Cut two sections 36 1/8 inches long from the 1-by-10 board, using the circular saw. These are the sides of the table. 2. Cut two sections 22 5/8 inches long from the 1-by-10 board
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The top of the zone of saturation is where the beginning of the water table begins.
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