Who Is the Remitter on a Money Order?

Answer

The remitter on a money order is the person whose name is printed on the slip, sending the money order. For example, the money order used to pay for an electric bill is named with 'Chris Allens,' the remitter of this money order is then Chris Allens who is also its sender.
Q&A Related to "Who Is the Remitter on a Money Order?"
Banks and other financial firms sell money orders to consumers and businesses. The entity that issues a money order has the responsibility to honor the item because money orders are
http://www.ehow.com/info_8626176_signs-remitter-mo...
The Remitter is the person paying the bill, the Payee is the person you
http://www.chacha.com/question/who-is-the-remitter...
A remitter is the person who sends the money order.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_does_remitter_mean_...
The remitter is YOU. If you're paying on an account you may also consider putting your account number along with your name. It's there so the person receiving it can apply it properly
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200804...
1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: who is the remitter on a money order
Who Signs As the Remitter on a Money Order?
Technically, the person who buys a money order should sign as the remitter. However, many banks do not require you to sign a money order at the time that your purchase it and you could allow someone else to sign as the remitter. Assuming that the correct... More »
Difficulty: Easy
Source: www.ehow.com
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