Why Are Noble Gases Unreactive?

Answer

Noble gases are unreactive since they are elements on group 8 or 0, which all have full outermost electron shells. This means they do not require to gain or lose electrons in reactions so as to become stable, and so they don't react with several other elements.
Q&A Related to "Why Are Noble Gases Unreactive?"
The Noble gases have a completely filled valence electron shell. Since they are already totally stable on their own, it takes too much energy to ionize them and make them bond with
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All the noble gases have the greatest number of electrons possible in their outer energy level,
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Answer is B. They have full outer electron shells due to which they are inert. Source(s) My teacher Danish Sir.
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Noble gases have a full shell of valence electrons. Unlike say, carbon, which has four electrons in the 2p orbital and can accept four more, the noble gases are completely full (have
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1 Additional Answer
Noble gases are unreactive because they are already stable. Some examples of noble gases are Argon, Helium and Krypton. Argon is used in light bulbs. You can find more information here: http://www.drbateman.net/gcse2003/gcsesums/chemsums/noblegases/noblegases.htm
Explore this Topic
Noble gases are unreactive because their outer electron shells are full and therefore in their most stable state. Normally, elements react with one another because ...
Noble gases don't react to other elements because their outer electron shells are already full. If it is full, then they will be unable to add or remove an electron ...
Metals tend to lose electrons due to the noble gases or which have 8 electrons in their outer shell. The electrons will loose some electrons to maintain the outer ...
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