Why Are There 12 Jurors?

Answer

The idea of settling disputes using a jury of 12 impartial witnesses has many theories. Some believe that it dates back to King Aethelred's Wantage code of 933. Others associate it with the 12 disciples, 12 days of Christmas and the 12 angry men. In Scotland however, a jury in a criminal trial consists of 15 jurors, which is thought to be the largest in the world.
Q&A Related to "Why Are There 12 Jurors"
There are not always 12 jurors, the number is specified by the laws of the state in which the legal action occurs. There can be between 6-12 jurors in a civil case and 12 jurors in
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The significance of twelve jurors comes from Biblical times. Jesus had the 12 disciples. In some trials having 12 jurors may also prevent a person from being found either innocent
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Based on precedent and tradition. The English system had twelve jurors and this was the general practice when the U.S. became a country. A jury is not always comprised of twelve members
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A jury may either be a petit (trial) jury or a grand jury. Petit juries are divided into civil and criminal, both with different duties and structures. The civil petit jury listens
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3 Additional Answers
According to the Criminal Justice Act 2003, it states that there should be twelve people in a Jury. It also states that anyone eligible for jury service must attend unless they can show evidence that explains why they can't be a juror on the current case.
The number of jurors was decided from the bible and the 12 disciples. But it can depend on the size of the case. It may have to have more then 12 jurors. It will all just depend on the case.
Having twelve people on a jury is really just tradition. It comes from when King Henry gathers 12 lawful men to determine land and inheritance disputes.
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