Why Are There 360 Degrees in a Circle?

Answer

There are 360 degrees in a circle because according to the Babylonians, they used a base 60 degree and divided a circle into 360 degrees. This is because the ancient Egyptians who also influenced the Babylonians as well had a 360 day year.
Q&A Related to "Why Are There 360 Degrees in a Circle"
Thanks the Babylonians. They had a number system based on 60. They took a hexagon and circumscribed a circle around it and found that the circumference around the hexagon is exactly
http://www.ask.com/web-answers/Science/Mathematics...
It's just a convention It's just a convention. Mathemeticians could have chosen some other number, but 360 is divisible by many whole numbers, so it is convenient. Answer It has some
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/why+are+circles+360+degr...
In 1936, a tablet was excavated some 200 miles from Babylon. Here one should
http://www.chacha.com/question/why-are-there-360-d...
Hector's guess is right. The Babylonians counted in two types of ways. First, the one we are all used to, by tens. Second, they also counted in bases of 60. This is called sexagesimal
http://www.quora.com/Who-decided-there-were-360-de...
1 Additional Answer
The reason there is 360 degrees in a circle is due to the Babylonians and the base of 60, which is how they worked with math. It is in regards to Pi which equals 3.14. Six pieces of pie equals 360 degrees. You can find more information here: http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/59075.html
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