Why did the United States enter World War I?

Answer

The major reason the Americans entered World War 1 was the sinking of the Lusitania, a British cruise/transport ship, bound for Britain from New York. The sinking of this ship resulted in deaths of among others some Americans who were onboard. This made many Americans urge their government to retaliate and join the war.
Q&A Related to "Why did the United States enter World War I?"
Many reasons are speculated as to why America actually entered WWI. Some reasons include bankers were involved, propaganda from both sides, and submarine warfare from the Germans.
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One of the main reasons the US entered the Great War was the success of Secretary of State John Hay to push rapprochement with the UK during the Roosevelt administration at the turn
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Apr 1, 2008 . The United States entered
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The United States entered World War I for numerous reasons. A German victory would have upset the established balance of power. Should England and her fleet fall into the hands of
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2 Additional Answers
The sinking of the British Lusitania ship by the Germans, which had 128 Americans on board, prompted the US to join World War 1. US viewed this as a threat to National Security and her citizens urged the government to retaliate. US then declared war against Germany in 1917, to join the side of allied powers in the war.
The United States was compelled to join World War I following the German U-boat attack on American boat, Lusitania, which sunk killing 120 people in 1915. This caused President Teddy Roosevelt to seek revenge.
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The majority of Americans felt that the United States should stay out of World War I because it was not a signatory to any of the agreements that had lured the ...
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