Why is quality control necessary?

Answer

Quality control is necessary to ensure that all products sold to customers are of the highest possible quality, according to Six Sigma Online from the Aveta Business Institute. During quality inspections, workers check for malfunctions, discolorations, potential hazards and other defects that can compromise the quality of the merchandise.

Quality control is important because business owners must ensure they manufacture products that customers want to buy over and over again. The goal of a quality control system is to ensure that each product meets or exceeds a specific standard. A quality control system can also help business owners identify weaknesses in products and come up with solutions for improving them.

Some companies hire outside agencies to perform quality control checks, while others designate staff members to perform this task. Some small business owners choose to perform quality control inspections themselves to regularly compare their products to similar ones in the marketplace. In service-based industries, quality control is generally performed using customer surveys. Getting feedback directly from customers is a cost-effective way to get up-to-date feedback on various aspects of a company from a customer's viewpoint. This type of quality control also gives customers the perception that they are valuable to a business.

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