Why Is a Wake Called a Wake?

Answer

A wake is called a wake because relatives and friends stood awake all night to mourn the dead. It is originally from the Celtic people who believed the body was at risk of thieves and people who might have done inappropriate things or steal the body or parts of it.
Q&A Related to "Why Is a Wake Called a Wake"
With relation to business, a wake-up call is when something happens, either an event or constructive feedback, that is designed to get the employee to understand how critical it is
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_wake_up_call
1. Research local markets to see if there is a need for your services. Those living in large urban areas may find it easier to start this kind of business. If there are one or more
http://www.ehow.com/how_4912754_start-wakeup-call-...
When you're falling asleep, it's called the Hypnagogic state. (Greek: hypn for sleep + agogos for leading or inducing) When you're waking up, it's called the Hypnopompic state. (Greek
http://www.quora.com/What-is-the-state-between-sle...
A wake is defined as a watch or vigil by the body of a dead person before burial,
http://www.chacha.com/question/why-are-funerals-ca...
1 Additional Answer
A wake is a ceremony associated with death. Traditionally, a wake takes place in the house of the deceased, with the body present; however, modern wakes are usually performed in funeral homes. According to legend, the word wake comes from the fact that the people at a wake are waiting incase the deceased should “wake up”.
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