Q:

What is an acquired trait?

A:

An acquired trait is a physical characteristic of an organism that is not passed down to offspring genetically. It is not coded in the organism's DNA and is a product of the environment's influence on the organism.

These traits can strongly influence the survival of an organism. Acquired traits can cause an organism with a genetic disadvantage to out-compete another. An example of an acquired trait is a bodybuilder's large muscles. They were acquired by lots of exercise and not genetics, so the offspring of the body builder are no more likely to have large muscles than other offspring. Since acquired traits cannot be passed on to offspring, they do not increase the fitness of a population, and natural selection does not influence them.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What element makes protein different from carbohydrates and fat?

    A:

    Along with fat and carbohydrates, protein is considered a "macro-nutrient," which means that the body requires large amounts of it; however, unlike fat and carbohydrates, the body does not store protein, so it needs to be acquired through the diet, according to WebMD.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a Mendelian trait?

    A:

    A Mendelian trait is a trait that is controlled by one locus and gives or shows a simple Mendelian inheritance pattern. There are a plethora of human traits that apply to this designation.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is selective breeding?

    A:

    Selective breeding is the process of choosing a breeding stock of an animal based on specific traits that a breeder wants to reproduce in the offspring. There are two types of selective breeding or artificial selection.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is an example of a Punnet square that demonstrates codominance?

    A:

    An example of a Punnet square that demonstrates codominance is made up of offspring that have blood type AB. A simple cross involves the parents being homozygous for dominant A (IA) or dominant B (IB). The genotypes of these parents are (IA, IA) and (IB, IB), where the resulting offspring all have a genotype of (IA, IB) making the phenotype of blood type AB.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore