Q:

What is the actual size of a human lung?

A:

A human lung is about the size of a football and weighs approximately 1 pound, according to the British Lung Foundation. The surface area of the lungs is similar to that of a tennis court.

The right lung is a bit larger than the left lung, the British Lung Foundation explains, as the left lung must share space in the chest with the heart. The lungs are made up of lobes; the right lung has three lobes, and the left lung has two.

The ribcage protects the lungs, notes the British Lung Foundation. The diaphragm, a muscle below the lungs, separates the chest from the abdomen and assists in the breathing process.

Sources:

  1. blf.org.uk

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