Q:

Does aluminum conduct electricity?

A:

Quick Answer

Aluminum conducts electricity. Chemists classify aluminum as a metal, which is a shiny element that excels at conducting heat and electricity. It is also a malleable and ductile metal, making it easy to shape into wires.

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Full Answer

Two properties of aluminum that make it a useful conduit for electricity are that it does not spark and it does not rust. Because it does not create sparks when struck, aluminum can be used safely near materials that are flammable or explosive. Its resistance to corrosion makes aluminum an ideal metal to use outdoors. Power lines, telephone wires and light bulbs all contain aluminum electrical materials.

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