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What are appendages?

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According to Reference.com, appendages, in zoology and anatomy, are any members of a body diverging from the axial trunk. Appendages can also be defined as subordinate or auxiliary parts attached to something.

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In botany and mycology, appendages are subsidiary parts of other parts. Appendages can also mean people in dependent or subordinate positions, such as parasitic or servile followers. Appendages are also organs or parts that are attached to a main structure and subordinate in size and/or function. The word's origin dates back to the mid-17th century, and the adjectives "appendaged" and "unappendaged" are both related forms of the word.

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