Q:

Where does argon come from?

A:

Quick Answer

Argon occurs naturally in the Earth's atmosphere and people source it by taking the liquid air and putting it through fractionation. The total argon in the atmosphere is only about 0.94 percent volume, making it the most prevalent noble gas.

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Where does argon come from?
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Full Answer

Argon is a type of noble gas that is an inert gaseous element with unreactive capabilities. Sir William Ramsay and Lord Rayleigh are responsible for the discovery of argon and this is a result of isolating argon from a type of air-sourced nitrogen. It gets its name due to its unreactive capabilities and "argon" translates to "the inactive one." It has many uses in many different products, including fluorescent light bulbs, medical lasers and radio vacuum tubes.

Sources:

  1. rsc.org

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