Q:

What is an autotroph?

A:

An autotroph is an organism that synthesizes food from inorganic substances by using chemical energy or light, according to the American Heritage Dictionary. Types of autotrophs include some kinds of bacteria, green plants and algae.

Autotrophs make their own food from substances present in their surroundings. Often, as is the case with algae, they make food for other creatures as well. Algae is a prime example of an autotroph that is a producer in the food chain. Not only does it feed itself, it produces food for other organisms, such as fish.

The word "autotroph" comes from the Greek words "auto," meaning "self" and "trophe," meaning "nutrition."

Some specific autotrophs include Venus fly traps, living rocks, green and purple sulfur bacteria and resurrection ferns.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Why is ATP an important molecule in metabolism?

    A:

    Adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, is the transport molecule for chemical energy within cells. The energy stored in the phosphate bonds contained in ATP is used for a wide variety of metabolic functions, including muscle contraction, molecular transport across cell membranes, and the creation of larger molecules from smaller units.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a biopolymer?

    A:

    A biopolymer is a polymer that is produced by a living organism, such as DNA, RNA, starch, cellulose and proteins. Cellulose is the most common biopolymer and organic compound found on Earth.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What type of organism makes its own food?

    A:

    An autotroph is an organism that makes its own food. An autotroph produces its own food via converting simple inorganic molecules into complex organic compounds. These complex organic compounds include proteins, fats and carbohydrates.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How does trypanosoma reproduce?

    A:

    Trypanosoma reproduces via binary fission, replicating its nucleus and other necessary organelles and then splitting into two daughter cells through cytokinesis. Trypanosoma species are eukaryotic single-celled parasites of several mammalian species, including humans, where they cause sleeping sickness or Chagas' disease. Trypanosoma uses both mammalian hosts and insect vectors in its life cycle, reproducing within both types of host, although they take different forms in each.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore