Q:

What are the biggest mountain peaks?

A:

The biggest mountain peaks in the world are all located in Asia and include: Mount Everest, K2, Kangchenjunga, Lhotse, Makalu and Cho Oyu, among others. Each of these mountains stands over 26,000 feet tall.

Mount Everest, the tallest mountain in the world, is located on the borders of Nepal and Tibet. It is an impressive 29,035 feet tall and is still growing about one-third of an inch each year. K2, the world's second tallest mountain, is located on the Pakistan-China border and stands 28,253 feet tall. Due to its extreme weather, K2 has been nicknamed "Savage Mountain." Although people have climbed K2 in the spring and summer months, no one has ever attempted climbing it during the winter.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Where is the tundra located?

    A:

    The tundra is located along the extreme northern edge of Asia, Europe and North America. The majority of the world's tundra forms a single unbroken belt along the northern reaches of the globe, but isolated patches can be found in the Southern Hemisphere.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What was the tallest mountain in 2014?

    A:

    At 29,035 feet above sea level, Mount Everest is the tallest mountain in the world as of 2014. Everest is part of the Himalayas and sits along the border of Nepal and Tibet.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the smallest mountain in the world?

    A:

    Mount Wycheproof is the smallest registered mountain in the world. Located in Australia’s Terrick Terrick Range, it is 486 feet above sea level; however, it only stands 141 feet above its surroundings. Mount Wycheproof is a granite outcrop.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is an upwarped mountain?

    A:

    An upwarped mountain is a mountain formed from force created by heat or magma pushing up directly under the Earth's crust. The force lifts the layers of rock in the Earth's crust above ground level.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore