Q:

What is the boiling point of sodium?

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Quick Answer

Sodium has a boiling point of 883 degrees Celsius or 1621 degrees Fahrenheit. It has a melting point of 97.72 degrees Celsius or 207.9 degrees Fahrenheit.

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What is the boiling point of sodium?
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Full Answer

The symbol for sodium is "Na," from the Latin word "natrium." Its atomic number is 11, and its atomic mass is 22.98977.

Sodium is considered an alkali metal. It is silvery white in appearance and is found as a salt in salt mines and sea water. Sodium was first isolated by Sir Humphrey David in 1807. Until then, there was no distinction between sodium and potassium. Potassium is a vegetable alkali, and sodium is a mineral alkali.

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Related Questions

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    What is sodium used for?

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    Sodium is used to create industrial and manufacturing compounds and is also a common additive in salts, baking soda and baking powder. Sodium is unique in that it is a mineral with nutritional and economic benefits. Sodium is essential for humans and other organisms and is also a key ingredient in many compounds, such as sodium compounds.

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    What is sodium bisulfate?

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    Sodium bisulfate is a dry acid often used as a fungicide, herbicide, pH adjuster or microbiocidein. It comes in a variety of consistencies, such as a powder, granular or crystal form, and is commonly found in metal finishing and swimming pool and household cleaning products.

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    What is sodium hypochloride?

    A:

    Sodium hypochloride is a stable compound of one sodium atom paired with a molecule composed of one oxygen and one chlorine. The sodium atom is positively charged and attracted to the negative oxygen atom of the oxygen-chlorine pair. It is also known as sodium hypochlorite, household bleach or Dakin's solution.

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    Where can sodium be found?

    A:

    While sodium is one of the most abundant elements in the crust of the Earth, About.com indicates it never exists in its elemental form. It is highly reactive and forms many compounds, including sodium chloride, or table salt. The most common form of sodium chloride on the Earth is halite, a mineral that miners remove from large mines. The rock salt from these mines remains from the evaporation of oceans.

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