Q:

What is the bone that protects your brain?

A:

Quick Answer

The brain is protected by one of two main parts of the skull called the neurocranium, which actually consists of eight different bones. The neurocranium includes the frontal bone, two parietal bones, two temporal bones, occipital, sphenoid and ethmoid bones.

Know More

Full Answer

The occipital bone serves two purposes in protecting the back of the brain and supporting the head's weight. Temporal and parietal bones also support parts of the face. The sphenoid is behind the eyes and forms part of the eye socket. Nearby is the ethmoid, which also supports the nose. The frontal bone protects the front and top of the brain, and it is located in the area known as the forehead.

Learn more about Bones
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What bones protect the spinal cord?

    A:

    The human spinal cord is protected by the spinal column, which is made up of bones called vertebrae. Each vertebra consists of the spinous process, transverse process and body. The spinal cord passes through the vertebral foramen, the middle opening in the vertebrae.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the only movable joint of the skull?

    A:

    BBC states that the only movable joint on the skull is part of the mandible, or the lower jaw bone. According to the University of Washington School of Medicine, the joint formed around the mandible is known as the temporomandibular joint.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are examples of fixed joints?

    A:

    Examples of fixed joints include the joints between the bones in the skull and the joint where the radius and ulna bones meet in the lower arm. Fixed joints, also known as fibrous joints, are places where two bones come together in the body but are unable to move. This type of joint is held together by fibrous connective tissue rather than ligaments and tendons.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What causes the skull to have indentations?

    A:

    Injury during birth, head trauma, vitamin A toxicity, separated or malformed sutures, application of pressure, or rare congenital conditions can cause indentations in the skull, according to Healthline. When one of the skull's bones cracks, the depressed skull fracture sometimes dents inward, according to Drugs.com.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore