Q:

What is a calcific density?

A:

A calcific density is a medical phenomenon in which calcium builds up on body tissue and causes it to harden. Calcific densities can occur in many parts of the body.

Calcific densities are caused by any disorder that leads calcium to be deposited in a part of the body other than the bones and teeth. Also known as calcifications, calcific densities can usually be seen in X-rays. Calcium deposits are often found in the arteries, kidneys, lungs and brain. They are usually benign, but depending on their size and location, removing them could prevent cancerous anomalies and other complications. Kidney stones are a common example of calcific densities.


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