Q:

Can DNA tests be wrong?

A:

Quick Answer

DNA tests are usually 99.99 percent accurate, which means they can be wrong 0.01 percent of the time. While those odds appear good, they are the accuracy rate under ideal scenarios where the integrity of samples is not a concern.

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Full Answer

Human error is always a factor in the accuracy of any medical test, and DNA tests are no exception. Medical tests require humans handling the samples and humans interpreting the results. In experienced, trustworthy labs, the risk of human error is minimized, but it can never be eliminated completely. In less-experienced and less-trustworthy labs, there is a greater risk of human error.

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    Why do we need DNA?

    A:

    Without DNA, life would not be able to perpetuate itself. DNA is needed as it is the blueprint of life. Every species of plants and animals contains a genetic substance called DNA that passes on the physical characteristics of an organism from one generation to the next.

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  • Q:

    How are DNA and RNA similar?

    A:

    Both DNA and RNA are macromolecules that consist of long chains of nucleotides. Both contain the specific nucleotide bases adenine, guanine and cytosine, although the fourth base differs between DNA and RNA. Both molecules are found in the cell's nucleus, but RNA may also be found in the cytoplasm.

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    What are the monomers of DNA and RNA?

    A:

    The monomers of DNA and RNA are nucleotides, which are made up of a phosphate group, a five-carbon sugar and a nitrogenous base. In DNA, the nitrogenous bases are adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine. In RNA, the nitrogenous bases are adenine, guanine, cytosine and uracil.

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    What is satellite DNA?

    A:

    Satellite DNA is the chief component of chromosomal centromeres, which hold two sister chromatids together. Satellite DNA nucleotide bases occur at different ratios than the nucleotide bases of normal DNA, which makes satellite DNA denser than regular DNA. Satellite DNA is so named because when DNA is separated according to its density, the satellite DNA makes a large ring around the rest of the DNA.

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