Q:

Can you donate blood if you have a tattoo?

A:

Quick Answer

The American Red Cross allows individuals with tattoos to donate blood if the tattoo was done at a state-regulated and licensed facility. If the tattoo was not done at a licensed facility, the Red Cross imposes a 12-month waiting period.

Know More
Can you donate blood if you have a tattoo?
Credit: Denise Krebs CC-BY-2.0

Full Answer

State regulated tattoo parlors must incorporate standard safety procedures into their practice. These facilities are subject to a high standard of cleanliness and may not reuse ink or needles on multiple clients. This ensures that customers are safe from blood-born pathogens like HIV and Hepatitis. If the tattoo was performed at an unregulated facility, the 12-month waiting period ensures that any diseases potentially contracted while receiving the tattoo will show up on a screening.

Learn more about Blood

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Is swallowing blood dangerous?

    A:

    Swallowing a small amount of blood is considered harmless, but swallowing a large amount can cause illness and vomiting, states HealthTap. Hemophilia of Georgia states that swallowed blood can stick to the lining of the stomach and also cause sickness.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Is blood blue or red?

    A:

    Blood in humans is red, not blue. It is a misconception that human blood is blue and turns red upon touching oxygen in the air.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a blood vessel that carries blood toward the heart?

    A:

    A vein is a blood vessel that carries blood toward the heart. There are four main types of veins: pulmonary and systemic, and superficial and deep.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How does blood clot?

    A:

    Clotting occurs when blood platelets adhere to the edges of a breached blood vessel and release chemicals that attract more platelets, resulting in a plug, as MedlinePlus explains. The plug stops external bleeding and allows clotting factors to stimulate the aggregation of fibrin fibers that eventually seals the breach internally.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore