Q:

How does carbon dioxide enter the leaf?

A:

Quick Answer

Carbon dioxide enters the leaf through tiny openings called the stomata. These specialized apertures open during the day to allow for the exchange of carbon dioxide and water in a process known as transpiration.

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Full Answer

The leaf of a plant is protected by a waxy substance called the cuticle. This prevents the air, containing carbon dioxide, from entering the leaf. Since carbon dioxide is one of the primary components that drive photosynthesis, plant leaves adapted and evolved these highly specialized structures to allow the passage of carbon dioxide. In some unicellular and marine autotrophic plants, carbon dioxide freely enters without passing through any specialized part.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    How does carbon dioxide affect plant growth?

    A:

    Plants require carbon dioxide for growth. It is a necessary ingredient for photosynthesis in which the plant creates glucose and structural carbon that forms the plant body. According to Nature Education, approximately 96 percent of the typical dry plant mass is due to compounds created through photosynthesis using carbon dioxide.

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  • Q:

    What does a stomata do?

    A:

    A stomata is the part of a plant that allows gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide to move freely into and out of a leaf. Every plant with above-ground leaves has stomata.

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  • Q:

    What are stomata responsible for?

    A:

    The main responsibilities of stomata, tiny openings on the bottoms of plant leaves, is the intake of carbon dioxide and the release of oxygen. These are necessary for photosynthesis to take place, since this process uses carbon dioxide and produces oxygen as a waste product.

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  • Q:

    Where are stomata found?

    A:

    The stomata in plant cells can be found in the epidermis of leaves, stems and other parts of the plant involved in gas exchange. The pores inside the spongy layer of the plant leaf help aid in the exchange of gases between the leaf and its environment, and these pores eventually open up to the outside through the stomata.

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