Q:

What color is each planet?

A:

Quick Answer

The colors for inner planets Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars are gray, yellowish-white, predominantly blue with patches of other colors and red-orange, respectively; the outer planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune have the colors orange with white bands, light yellow, light blue and pale blue, respectively. Mercury, which is the closest planet to the sun, has no atmosphere, and its surface appears gray. Mars color is red-orange because its surface contains rust-colored rocks.

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Full Answer

The yellowish-white appearance of Venus is due the sulfuric acid clouds in its atmosphere. The Earth is mainly blue in color due to its water sources. However, when seen from space, patches of the colors brown, white, green and yellow are visible. The while colors are due to the clouds, and some continents appear green.

Similarly, the different colors associated with the outer planets are associated with the types of atmospheres found on these planets. For example, Uranus and Neptune have a blue hue because of the methane clouds found in their atmospheres.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Who named the planet Mercury?

    A:

    The planet Mercury was named by ancient Romans after their messenger god and the god of travelers, Mercury. They believed that their messenger god, Mercury, had wings on his shoes and could fly quickly from one place to another.

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  • Q:

    How much does Saturn weigh?

    A:

    Because weight is calculated based on gravitational pull, it is impractical to determine the weight of a planet. For example, an object weighing 500 pounds on Earth weighs 465 pounds on Saturn because of the planets' different gravitational pulls. Thus, planets are compared by calculating their mass, which remains constant.

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  • Q:

    What is the difference between a moon and a planet?

    A:

    NASA states that for an astronomical body to be considered a moon, that object must orbit a planet. For a planet to be classified as such, it must meet certain strict criteria set by the International Astronomical Union.

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  • Q:

    Why is Pluto not a planet?

    A:

    In 2006, the International Astronomical Union changed Pluto's classification from a planet to a dwarf planet because the planet has not cleared its orbit of other objects. When a planet clears its orbit, all other objects on the orbital path are either drawn into the planet's gravitational pull or flung away from it and out of the orbit.

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