Q:

What is a concentrated solution?

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A concentrated solution is one in which there is a large amount of substance present in a mixture. The degree of concentration is measured in moles.

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An aqueous solution contains at least two substances: the solvent, water and a solute — the matter that will be dissolved in the water. The amount of solute that is dissolved in a solvent is the concentration. To keep track of the concentration, you can keep track of the mass. However, many find it easier to measure liquids using molarity, which is the number of moles of solute in a solution divided by the volume of the solution in liters.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are nonpolar solutes?

    A:

    A nonpolar solute is a substance that has no dipole elements and is dissolved in a solution. Many of these solutes are organic chemicals dissolved in organic liquids. Solutions follow the rule of like dissolves like, so nonpolar solutes are difficult to dissolve in polar solvents, such as water.

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  • Q:

    What is another name for a homogeneous mixture?

    A:

    Another name for a homogeneous mixture is a solution. The term "solution" is more frequently used when a homogeneous mixture is a liquid, although it is sometimes used if the homogeneous mixture is a gas. Another name for a solid homogeneous mixture of metals is an alloy.

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  • Q:

    What is chemical dissolution?

    A:

    Chemical dissolution is when a solute contacts a solvent and forms a solution by dissolving. Dissolution is the reverse of the precipitation process, and the two processes form a dynamic equilibrium.

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  • Q:

    How do you calculate molarity?

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    Molarity is an unit for expressing the concentration of a solute in a solution, and it is calculated by dividing the moles of solute by the liters of solution. Written in equation form, molarity = moles of solute / liters of solution.

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