Q:

What is the definition of "translational motion"?

A:

Translational motion is the movement of an object from one point to another through space. An example of this is a bullet fired from a rifle.

Theoretically, translational motion of an object can occur along a curved path. In practical terms, however, translational motion more often occurs along straight lines. Since an object only changes its motion when a force acts upon it, and because force is defined as the product of mass and acceleration, it is more difficult to change the translational motion of a heavier object than a lighter one. The study of translational motion is known as translational dynamics.

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