Q:

What is the definition of "urinary suppression"?

A:

Quick Answer

Urinary suppression is a medical condition in which urine production by the kidneys abruptly declines. This condition in where urine production and excretion is less than 500 ml in a 24-hour period is also known as oliguria in the medical profession.

  Know More

Full Answer

Some of the causes of urinary suppression are dehydration from diarrhea and vomiting, inadequate fluid intake and renal infections. Severe cases of this medical condition can lead to delirium, coma and effusion due to nitrogenous waste build up in the blood.

Symptoms of this medical condition include changes in urine excretion, loss of appetite, vomiting, nausea and sleep problems, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Learn more about Human Anatomy

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Where does tubular secretion happen?

    A:

    The process of tubular secretion occurs in the epithelial cells in both of the renal tubules and the collecting ducts of the kidneys. The process helps the kidneys clean and filter the blood while producing urine.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are fun facts about the excretory system?

    A:

    One fun fact about the excretory system is that the kidneys receive signals to produce less urine in an effort to preserve hydration when the temperature is hot or there isn't much drinking water available, according to Biology4Kids. When someone consumes too much water, hormones release to make urine production increase.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the role of antidiuretic hormone in urine production?

    A:

    Antidiuretic hormone, typically called ADH, reduces the amount of urine production and can also release water from the kidneys back into the circulatory system. Osmoreceptors, a type of sensory neuron, measure the concentration of certain chemicals in a human's bloodstream, and if the concentrations are too high, ADH is released. ADH then connects to and opens kidney cell receptors to allow water to dilute the blood.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the primary site of tubular reabsorption?

    A:

    Tubular reabsorption occurs along the renal tubules of the kidneys, explains Dr. Perry Carter of Midlands Technical College. A renal tubule consists of a proximal convoluted tubule, the loop of Henle and distal convoluted tubule. Filtrate from the renal corpuscle drains into the proximal convoluted tubule, where reabsorption immediately begins.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore