Q:

What is the definition of "water-holding capacity"?

A:

Water-holding capacity is defined as the water retained between field capacity and wilting point. Field capacity is the saturated state of water in the soil that can drain freely due to the force of gravity. Wilting point is the soil water level after its absorption by a plant.

The water that remains in the soil after draining is held by a force greater than gravity. The water level in the soil that can no longer be absorbed by the plants is referred as the permanent wilting point, and this water is strongly attached to the soil particles. The available water to the plant is considered to be 50 percent of the soil's water-holding capacity. The water level that is held by the soil between saturation and field capacity is referred as gravitational water.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are the 10 major land biomes?

    A:

    There is some debate among scientists as to the number of terrestrial or land biomes, but most lists include desert, tundra, tropical rainforest, temperate forest and temperate grassland. Most scientists also list savannah, taiga, chaparral, and the alpine or polar biomes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the importance of animals to the environment?

    A:

    Animals help maintain the Earth's natural environments by predating upon plants and other animals, pollinating various plants, and exhaling carbon dioxide, which green plants require to live. Additionally, animals help to fertilize plants via their droppings, which provide nutrition for plants, and seed-dispersal tendencies, which help plants to disperse through habitats. Once they die, animals also serve as food for microorganisms and supplemental minerals for plants.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is an invasive species?

    A:

    An invasive species is any organism that causes damage to an ecosystem in which it did not originate. An invasive species may cause reduced biodiversity and extinction of other plants and animals in a new environment incapable of defending against its effects.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between male and female pine cones?

    A:

    The pine cones typically thought of as pine cones are actually the bigger female pine cones; male pine cones are not as woody and are much smaller in size. Female pine cones hold the seeds whereas male pine cones contain the pollen. Most conifers, or cone-bearing trees, have female and male pine cones on the same tree.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore