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How is a delta formed?

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Quick Answer

A delta is usually formed when a river empties its water into an ocean, a lake or any other body of water. Some of the river's sediments are deposited at its mouth, forming a delta.

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Full Answer

A delta is a wetland, which means an area of land that is saturated or covered by water. There are three kinds of delta, fan-shaped or arcuate, cuspate and bird's foot. The fan-shaped delta is formed when a river splits numerous times at its mouth, forming a fan effect. An example is the Niger Delta. An arcuate delta is tooth-shaped and the pointed version is the cuspate type, for example, the Tiber Delta. An example of the bird's foot type is the Mississippi Delta, which has a few, broadly spaced tributaries that seem bird-like.

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