What is the density of sand?
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Q:

What is the density of sand?

A:

Quick Answer

The density of loose sand is 90 pounds per cubic foot. The density of sand depends on how wet it is; completely dry sand is 80 pounds per cubic foot, damp sand is 100 pounds per cubic foot, wet sand is 120 pounds per cubic foot, and wet packed sand is 130 pounds per cubic foot.

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Full Answer

The density of sand also depends on what kind of sand it is. Silica sand is 95 pounds per cubic foot, phosphate sand is 90 to 100 pounds per cubic foot and quartz sand is 80 to 100 pounds per cubic foot. A mix of sand and gravel is 108 pounds per cubic foot when it is dry or 125 pounds per cubic foot when it is wet.

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