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Where did Marie Curie work?

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Quick Answer

Though she was a native of Poland, Marie Curie, born Maria Sklodowska, did much of her groundbreaking work in the laboratory at the Municipal School of Industrial Physics and Chemistry in Paris, France. She also did work at the Sorbonne and the University of Paris.

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Marie Curie moved to Paris in 1891 to study at the Sorbonne, where she met her husband-to-be, Pierre Curie, who was a physics professor. The couple did much research together, and their work resulted in the discovery of polonium and radium. She and her husband shared a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1903 with Henri Becquerel, and she won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry herself in 1911 for her research on radioactivity.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Where did Marie Curie go to school?

    A:

    Marie Curie studied at Sorbonne in Paris, France. Sorbonne was the original home of the University of Paris or what is known today as the Sorbonne University. The modern day Sorbonne University combines eight different schools including the Paris-Sorbonne University and the Pierre et Marie Curie University.

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  • Q:

    What did Marie Curie do?

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    Marie Curie is credited for studying radioactive isotopes, discovering and naming two elements on the Periodic Table: polonium and radium. She is also given credit for developing the earliest x-ray machines.

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  • Q:

    What is Poland famous for?

    A:

    Poland is famous for being the home of scientist Marie Curie, composer Frederic Chopin and astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus. Three of the most famous Nazi concentration camps were also located in Poland: Belzec, Treblinka and Auschwitz-Birkenau.

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  • Q:

    How did Marie Curie change the world?

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    Marie Curie changed the world by advancing science and the study of radiation and by creating a place for women in the scientific community. She is often viewed as the mother of modern physics, and she was also the first woman in Europe to receive a PhD in research science.

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