Q:

When did Mt. Fuji erupt?

A:

Mount Fuji is an active volcano whose last eruption was in 1707. According to National Geographic, Mount Fuji has a symbolic, physical, spiritual and cultural importance to Japan. At 12,380 feet, Mount Fuji, which is located 62 miles from Tokyo, has the highest peak in Japan.

About 200,000 tourists visit the summit of Mount Fuji annually. According to Japan Today, there is an expectation that Mount Fuji may erupt between 2011 and 2015. The main indicator of this is the increase in pressure within the mountain's magma chamber. The mountain is located atop a "triple junction" where three tectonic plates, the Amurian, Okhotsk and Filipino plates, converge.


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