Q:

What is the difference between satin and brushed nickel?

A:

Quick Answer

Satin nickel has a very shiny and polished look, while brushed nickel has a rougher appearance. The rough look of brushed nickel is caused by the use of a wire brush that is applied to the surface of the metal in one direction.

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What is the difference between satin and brushed nickel?
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Full Answer

Satin nickel isn't technically a metal itself, but a nickel plating that is applied to pulls, handles and knobs through electrolysis and then treated with lacquer to dull the surface a little bit.

Brushed nickel receives its unique look when a wire brush is used to create abrasions on the surface, which is meant to get rid of its natural, more polished look.

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