Q:

What is the difference between static and dynamic loads?

A:

Static loads are loads that exert a constant amount of force, while dynamic loads exert varying amounts of force upon the structure that is upholding them. A simple example of a static load is the weight of a bridge span upon the bridge pilings holding it aloft. A truck moving across that same bridge span would be exerting a dynamic load on the pilings.

Other examples of dynamic loads include wind blowing on the face of a building, water sloshing in a jar and dice bouncing up and out of a can. The variations of dynamic loads can be due to changes in mass, direction of movement, pressure or speed of movement.

Sources:

  1. yale.edu

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