Q:

What is the difference between thermistor and thermocouple?

A:

Thermocouples produce a measurable voltage as the surrounding temperature increases or decreases, where thermistors change their resistance to electrical current as the temperature changes. Also, thermocouples and thermistors are used in different applications, depending upon the precision needed and the temperature ranges involved.

Thermocouples exploit the fact that when two dissimilar metals are joined together and in the presence of changing temperatures, a difference in the electrical potential, or voltage, between the two metals changes. This is known as the Seebeck Effect, named after its discoverer, Thomas Seebeck. Thermocouples are used in high-heat applications, typically where they are the only viable option. However, when compared to thermistors, thermocouples are not as precise or accurate and often need recalibration before and after each use.

Thermistors, on the other hand, are restricted to lower-temperature applications but have much better accuracy and reliably track changes far more precisely than the average thermocouple. Because they are small, lightweight and very accurate, thermistors are more often used in conjunction with microprocessors and data recording units. Thanks to their smaller sizes, thermistors are often arranged with redundant counterparts for data integrity. Since they produce such large, proportional changes in resistance for a given change in temperature, thermistors provide a much more accurate representation of the actual changes in temperature.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    How does a digital thermometer work?

    A:

    Digital thermometers work on the principle that changes in temperature cause the resistance of a sensor to change allowing a computer to convert the difference to a digital read-out. The sensor is a thermoresistor, commonly called a thermistor, according to HowStuffWorks.com.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does Ohm

    A:

    Ohm's law states that as long as a conductor's ambient temperature does not change, the electrical current flowing through it will be equal to the voltage divided by the conductor's resistance. The basic formula for determining the electric current is written as I = V/R. Electric current is represented by "I," voltage by "V" and resistance as "R."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between 120v and 240v?

    A:

    The main difference between 120V and 240V is the amount of electrical power that flows through the wires. Outlets with a 240V rating supply twice as much electrical power as those rated 120V.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the difference between inertia and momentum?

    A:

    Inertia is a scalar, something that only has a magnitude, and is defined as the resistance of an object to its state of motion, which also includes the state of rest. An object's mass is a measure of its inertia. Momentum is a vector, something that has a magnitude and direction. It's a measure of an object's motion and is dependent on the product of an object's mass and velocity.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore