Q:

Where does DNA transcription take place?

A:

Quick Answer

DNA transcription takes place in the nucleus of a cell, which is where DNA is located. The process begins when the enzyme RNA polymerase hooks itself to a specific sequence found on the DNA at a place called the promoter region.

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Full Answer

The purpose of DNA transcription is to copy genetic information from DNA to RNA so that the information in RNA can be used to produce proteins. This process helps preserve the integrity of the DNA information and prevents it from becoming tainted.

One of the main differences in DNA and RNA is the composition of their nucleotide bases. DNA contains adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine. RNA also contains adenine, guanine and cytosine, but its fourth base is uracil.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Where is the genetic material found in a cell?

    A:

    DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is found in the nucleus of a cell. Also, a small amount of DNA known as mitochondrial DNA, or mtDNA, is found in the mitochondria of the cell because the 37 genes found in mtDNA are necessary for the mitochondria to function. Every living creature has unique DNA that contains its biological instructions.

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  • Q:

    What is DNA and RNA?

    A:

    DNA and RNA are nucleic acids, which are also considered polymers. Deoxyribonucleic acid is used to create ribonucleic acid that, in turn, contains the primary sequence of amino acids needed to make proteins.

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  • Q:

    What is DNA isolation?

    A:

    DNA isolation is the process by which scientists are able to separate the DNA that is located within the cell from the proteins and other substances that are in the cell. DNA isolation allows scientists to look at the DNA that is contained within the cell in an environment that is not obstructed by the other structures of the cell.

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  • Q:

    How does the nucleus control what happens in a lysosome?

    A:

    The nucleus indirectly controls what happens in a lysosome by producing DNA that is copied into a protein, which then binds to the DNA that builds lysosomes. Lysosomes, small enzyme-filled sacs, are responsible for the digestion of foreign particles or excess molecules in the cell. This first type of DNA has the power to activate certain genes in the lysosome-building DNA, thereby controlling characteristics and functions of the lysosomes.

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