What enzymes digest fats?
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Q:

What enzymes digest fats?

A:

Quick Answer

Lipase is the name of the enzyme that digests fats. Although the stomach produces small quantities of gastric lipase, the pancreas is the main location for the production of lipase known as pancreatic lipase.

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Full Answer

The pancreas secretes the enzyme lipase that breaks down various lipids or fat nutrients, such as triglycerides found in the foods people eat. Lipase breaks down and converts large fat molecules into smaller molecules called glycerol and fatty acids. This process takes place in the small intestine. The blood then absorbs the glycerol and fatty acids.

The pancreas is an important part of the digestive system because it also produces other types of enzymes, such as amylase and trypsin. While amylase breaks down carbohydrates, trypsin digests proteins. The pancreas also produces the hormone insulin.

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