Q:

How does erosion occur?

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Quick Answer

Erosion occurs as a result of wind and water moving across earth and picking up part or all of dirt or rocks. By definition, erosion only requires earth to be moved, but in most cases, rocks or land are also worn down or broken into pieces.

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Full Answer

Erosion can be classified as either natural erosion or human-caused erosion. If the erosion is caused as a result of construction, agriculture or a variety of other human activities, it is not considered natural erosion. Erosion is not usually a good thing for the health of land since it can strip away topsoil that contains a significant number of nutrients needed to grow plants and sustain other life.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is erosion?

    A:

    Erosion is a natural process in which rocks or soil are moved from one location to another by wind or water. Material may move through erosion for distances ranging from a few feet to thousands of miles. Erosion often is most noticeable along shorelines, but it occurs in a variety of areas throughout the world.

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  • Q:

    How is wind erosion different from water erosion?

    A:

    Wind erosion happens when pieces of the Earth are worn away by strong winds over time, and water erosion happens when moving water such as ocean waves wear away rock instead of seeping into the ground. Water is a more powerful erosion force than wind.

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  • Q:

    What are the types of erosion?

    A:

    The three major types of erosion are the transporting of soil or rocks by moving water, wind or ice. Water is the primary force behind erosion. The waves of the ocean, movement of a river and falling of rain are all ways water transports materials from one location to another.

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  • Q:

    What is chemical erosion?

    A:

    Chemical erosion occurs when water transports dissolved minerals away from their source rocks. It follows chemical weathering, which results from the chemical alteration of rock by water. Chemical erosion is most common with limestone; slightly acidic rainwater dissolves calcium carbonate in the rock and redeposits it, sometimes far away, as in stalagmites and stalactites. Through oxidation, chemical erosion also occurs to some degree with unstable igneous minerals and iron-rich rocks.

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