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What are the events of meiosis?

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Quick Answer

The main events of meiosis include prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase. A cell in meiosis goes through two divisions, meiosis I and meiosis II, in which each division consists of the same stages to produce gametes or sexual reproduction cells.

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Full Answer

Tetrads, a connected grouping of chromatids, develop with the breakdown of DNA that occurs in prophase. In metaphase, genetic recombination and spindle formation occurs. During anaphase, the tetrads split apart into two pairs pulling to opposite sides of the cell. In telophase, the nuclear envelope holding the chromosomes forms to create a haploid. The process repeats again, but the two opposite sides with the chromosomes develop a cleavage furrow between the two pairs, and the one cell eventually divides into two cells.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between meiosis 1 and meiosis 2?

    A:

    The essential difference between meiosis I and meiosis II is in purpose. Meiosis I is dedicated to forming two haploid cells from one diploid cell, while meiosis II is meant to split the sister chromatids in the haploid cells produced in meiosis I, creating four daughter cells. Meiosis I also recombines, or shuffles, genes on each pair of chromosomes. Meiosis I and meiosis II happen in succession.

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  • Q:

    What is the purpose of meiosis?

    A:

    Meiosis is the process of cell division that creates offspring in sexually reproducing organisms, explains a University of Illinois at Chicago website. Unlike during mitosis, meiotic cell division starts with double the number of chromosomes in diploid parent cells. Meiosis cuts this number in half forming two haploid daughter cells. When these daughter cells combine and undergo fertilization, a zygote is created and the cell begins to develop.

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  • Q:

    What happens in meiosis 1?

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    During meiosis 1, a diploid cell's chromosomes segregate and produce four haploid cells. It is the completion of this phase that leads to genetic diversity.

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  • Q:

    Why is crossing over important in meiosis?

    A:

    Crossing over in meiosis results in genetic recombination, which is responsible for the genetic diversity of a population. Genetic recombination and natural selection are the driving forces behind evolution. It causes most of the differences between parents and their offspring and differences between siblings.

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