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What is an example of Gay-Lussac's Law in everyday life?

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An example of Gay-Lussac's Law in everyday life is the shooting of a gun. As gunpowder burns, it creates superheated gas, which forces the bullet out of the gun barrel following Gay-Lussac's Law. Other everyday life examples can be found in things that use gas and pressure in order to function.

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All gases have different properties that can be observed via the senses. These properties include temperature, mass, volume and the pressure contained within the gas. Scientists have discovered that all of these properties within a gas are related to one another, and it is these properties that determine the gas' state.

Charles and Gay-Lussac were two French scientists who first discovered, and then investigated, the relationship between temperature and volume in gases. The temperature and volume of a gas are always found at constant numbers of both moles and pressure. This rule is now called the Charles and Gay-Lussac Law to honor the scientists. Originally, Charles did the work and then Gay-Lussac verified the work. They both found that as pressure held constant in the gas, the volume was equal to the constant times the temperature. This formula is known as V (volume) = Constant (C) multiplied by T (temperature).

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