Q:

What are some example of third-class levers?

A:

Two examples of third-class levers are a hammer driving a nail and the human forearm. In third-class levers, the effort is placed between the load and the fulcrum.

When a hammer drives a nail, the fulcrum is the human wrist and the hand is what supplies the effort. The load is the resistance of the wood. With the human forearm, the fulcrum is the elbow, the biceps muscle supplies the effort, and the load is the wood's resistance. In addition to third-class levers, there are first- and second-class levers. One example of a first-class lever is a seesaw. An example of a second-class lever is a wheelbarrow.

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  • Q:

    What are some types of first-class levers?

    A:

    Some of the types of first-class levers include crowbars, scissors, seesaws, fishing rods, pliers, balance scales, trebuchets and hammers when removing nails. All of these levers have a fulcrum positioned between load and effort. First-class levers are the most common type of levers.

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  • Q:

    What are some examples of first-class levers?

    A:

    Examples of first-class levers include a balance scale, a seesaw and a crowbar. A first-class lever places the fulcrum in the middle of the effort and the load.

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  • Q:

    What are 1st, 2nd and 3rd class levers?

    A:

    The first class lever uses the fulcrum in between the applied force and load, the second class lever uses the load between the fulcrum and applied force and the third class lever uses the applied force between the fulcrum and the load. Levers help to lift heavy objects.

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  • Q:

    How do levers work?

    A:

    HowStuffWorks explains that levers work by reducing the force needed to move weights. They achieve this by increasing the distance through which the required force acts. For instance, a 1-kilogram force that acts through a distance of 3 meters is capable of moving a 3-kilogram weight in 1 meter, if friction is ignored.

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