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What are some example of third-class levers?

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Quick Answer

Two examples of third-class levers are a hammer driving a nail and the human forearm. In third-class levers, the effort is placed between the load and the fulcrum.

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What are some example of third-class levers?
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When a hammer drives a nail, the fulcrum is the human wrist and the hand is what supplies the effort. The load is the resistance of the wood. With the human forearm, the fulcrum is the elbow, the biceps muscle supplies the effort, and the load is the wood's resistance. In addition to third-class levers, there are first- and second-class levers. One example of a first-class lever is a seesaw. An example of a second-class lever is a wheelbarrow.

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