Q:

What are some examples of aquatic plants?

A:

Examples of aquatic plants include the water lily, Victorian water lily, frog-bit, floating heart, pondweed, water-shield, yellow pond-lily, cape-pondweed and water-chestnut. Also referred to as aquatic macrophytes or hydrophytes, aquatic plants are plants that are adapted to live in water or aquatic environment.

Aquatic plants have a thin cuticle because most hydrophytes have no need for cuticles. They have many stomata that are open most of the time to allow transpiration of water. Also, stomata can be found on both sides of the leaves. Hydrophytes have fat and large leaves to allow for floatation on water. They have small roots since there is enough water within reach.


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