Q:

What are some examples of monocot seeds?

A:

Quick Answer

Monocot seeds include garlic, onion, corn, rice, wheat, asparagus, lilies and orchids. These seeds are classified as monocots because they only have one cotyledon inside of their seeds.

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Full Answer

Monocots are also known as monocotyledonous seeds. These seeds often produce plants with narrow and long leaves. The other type of seed species is the dicots, or dicotyledonous seeds.

Dicots have two cotyledons and contain endosperms inside of their seeds. They produce plants with thick, wide leaves. Examples of dicot seeds include tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, cabbage, turnips, apples, plugs, carrots and celery. Dicots produce large leaves so that the leaves can nourish new dicot seeds.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are some examples of monocot flowers?

    A:

    Lilies, tulips, orchids, bluebells, crocuses, amaryllis and daffodils all belong to the monocot class. Monocots can be identified by the number of parts of the flower, with petals or stamens found in numbers divisible by three.

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  • Q:

    What is a labeled monocot stem?

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    A labeled monocot stem is a diagram that features the cross section of a monocot plant stem. In this diagram, the parts of the monocot stem are labeled and usually consist of the vascular bundle, the parenchyma, the cortex, the epidermis, the xylem, and the phloem.

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  • Q:

    What are monocot leaves?

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    Monocot leaves have veins that are parallel, have leaves that are in groups of three, have one cotyledon and have scattered vascular bundles. They are one type of a leaf with the majority of other leaves being dicot leaves.

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  • Q:

    What is the difference between monocot and dicot flowers?

    A:

    According to the University of California Museum of Paleontology, the major morphological differences between monocot and dicot flowers include the number of cotyledons, pollen structure, number of flower parts, leaf veins, stem vascular arrangement, root development and secondary growth. The actual basis for differentiating the two classes of angiosperms is the number of cotyledons in the embryo.

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