Q:

What are some examples of translucent material?

A:

Quick Answer

Translucent materials allow light to pass through them, but they diffuse the light in a way that make objects on the opposite side appear blurred. Examples of translucent materials are frosted glass, oil paper, some plastics, ice and tissue paper.

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What are some examples of translucent material?
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Full Answer

Translucent materials obscure objects because they allow some light to pass through, but the light that is allowed to pass through hits particles found within the material and scatters it in all directions. Translucent materials should not be confused with opaque materials. The latter does not allow light to pass through at all. Instead, the object or material absorbs the light as heat.

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