Q:

What are examples of unsaturated solutions?

A:

Quick Answer

Unsaturated solutions are solutions that contain less solute than the actual amount of solute that the solvent can dissolve. If more solutes can be dissolved in the solution, the solution is still considered unsaturated. Every solute and solvent combination has its limit, and once this limit is reached, the substance is in a state that is called the saturation point.

  Know More

Full Answer

An example of an unsaturated solution is a teaspoon of sugar in a glass of water. If one adds a teaspoon of sugar to a glass of water, it dissolves, and one can still add more sugar to it because it is still unsaturated. However, at some point, the sugar no longer dissolves in the water because the substance is saturated. In other words, the solution has reached its saturation limit. The same process holds with salt and water, a small amount of salt in a large bucket of water dissolves, and the water is considered an unsaturated solution. Iced tea and coffee can also be considered examples of unsaturated solutions. There are different solubility rules to consider in determining how much of a solute can be dissolved in a given amount of solvent, but as long as the solvent can dissolve more of the solute being added, it is still considered an unsaturated solution.

Learn more about Solutions & Mixtures

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a dissolved substance?

    A:

    A dissolved substance is a solute that is completely soluble in the solvent, resulting in the formation of a homogeneous solution. The solute can be a solid or a liquid or a gas.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a non-aqueous solvent?

    A:

    A solvent is a substance that dissolves a solute in the formation of a solution, and any solvent other than water is considered a non-aqueous solvent. Some common examples include ether, alcohol, benzene, disulphide, carbon tetrachloride and acetone. While water is a useful solvent for investigating acid-base properties, the differences between water and other solvents mean that non-aqueous solvents often provide more realistic experimental outcomes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a solvent?

    A:

    A solvent is a component in a solution that dissolves the solute, which is another component of the solution. The solvent is generally the component present in the largest amounts in the solution, according to World of Molecules.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do solutions form?

    A:

    Solutions are formed when a solute is dissolved in a solvent. The type of chemicals and compounds that act as the solute and solvent can vary greatly. As long as the mixture is homogeneous, it can be classified as a solution.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore