Our Moon

A:

A red moon occurs when the Earth eclipses the moon from sunlight. The moon looks red due to dispersed light from Earth's sunrises and sunsets that is refracted back onto the moon's surface.

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  • How did a pen save Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin?

    Q: How did a pen save Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin?

    A:

    When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin first attempted to pilot their lunar lander back off the moon, a critical switch broke, forcing the astronauts to improvise a solution with a ballpoint pen. Aldrin took responsibility for breaking the switch, but he was also the one who found the solution in a ballpoint pen.

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  • Why did we go to the moon?

    Q: Why did we go to the moon?

    A:

    One of the main reasons the United States sponsored a mission to the moon was because of the space race with Russia. Russia was the first country to put an artificial satellite in space, which caused a lot of embarrassment for the U.S.

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  • Why do we always see the same face of the moon?

    Q: Why do we always see the same face of the moon?

    A:

    The moon is tidally locked with Earth, which has the effect of synchronizing its rotation period with the period of its orbit. Completing one "day" per orbit of the Earth, the moon has shown the same face to the Earth for billions of years.

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  • How many times did we land on the moon?

    Q: How many times did we land on the moon?

    A:

    According to NASA, there have been six lunar landings, all under the Apollo program. The first moon landing was by Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969. The last was Apollo 17, which landed on the moon on December 7, 1972.

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  • How does the moon affect the Earth?

    Q: How does the moon affect the Earth?

    A:

    The main way the moon affects the Earth is the tides. The moon plays an important role in protecting the Earth from space rocks, such as meteorites. More subtle effects of the moon include minor effects on climate, the heat of the crust and the speed of the Earth's rotation.

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  • What are the phases of the moon?

    Q: What are the phases of the moon?

    A:

    The phases of the moon are: new moon, waxing crescent, first quarter, waxing gibbous, full, waning gibbous, third quarter and waning crescent. After the waning-crescent phase the moon returns to the new-moon phase and the cycle starts again. The complete cycle takes a little over 29 days.

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  • How close does the moon get to the Earth?

    Q: How close does the moon get to the Earth?

    A:

    The moon travels in an elliptical orbit, and at perigee, the closest it gets to Earth, it stands about 225,623 miles, or 363,104 kilometers away.

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  • Was Neil Armstrong misquoted?

    Q: Was Neil Armstrong misquoted?

    A:

    Whether Neil Armstrong's famous saying "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" is a misquote or not seems to be a matter of some debate. NASA authorities at the time claimed he said "one small step for a man" and Armstrong himself has occupied both sides of the debate at different times.

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  • What is the moon made of?

    Q: What is the moon made of?

    A:

    The lunar crust is made of 43 percent oxygen, 20 percent silicon, 19 percent magnesium, 10 percent iron, 3 percent calcium and 3 percent aluminum. The moon's core is thought to consist of iron, sulfur and nickel, with the largest middle layer, or mantle, composed of olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene.

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  • How long does it take the moon to orbit the Earth?

    Q: How long does it take the moon to orbit the Earth?

    A:

    The Earth's moon takes 27 Earth days to completely orbit the Earth. A day on the moon is also equal to a little over 27 days on Earth.

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  • Why is the moon not a planet?

    Q: Why is the moon not a planet?

    A:

    The moon is not a planet because, by definition, a planet is a "spherical ball of rock or gas that orbits a star," according to About.com. While the moon is a spherical ball of rock, it orbits the Earth and not the sun.

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  • Whose ashes were brought to the moon?

    Q: Whose ashes were brought to the moon?

    A:

    In 1999, a space probe called the Lunar Prospector carried some of the ashes of American scientist Eugene Shoemaker to the moon. As of 2015, Shoemaker is the only human to be "buried" on the moon, though not all of Shoemaker's remains were sent with the Prospector.

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  • How bright is the moon compared to the sun?

    Q: How bright is the moon compared to the sun?

    A:

    Just as day is brighter than night, the sun is much brighter than the moon — 400,000 times brighter, to be exact. That's compared to even the fullest, brightest full moon. From an astronomical standpoint, this is no surprise. The moon doesn't generate its own light, and the burning sun provides the vast majority of all the natural light on earth.

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  • How much of the moon is always lit by the sun?

    Q: How much of the moon is always lit by the sun?

    A:

    Half of the moon is always lit by the sun, unless the sun is eclipsed by the Earth. The portion of the illuminated moon viewed from Earth depends on the moon's orbit. As the moon orbits, different portions of shadow and illumination are seen from Earth, creating the moon's phases.

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  • Does the moon have quakes?

    Q: Does the moon have quakes?

    A:

    There is evidence that the moon is seismically active, which means it can experience the moon version of an earthquake. During the 1969 and 1972 moon landings, astronauts placed seismometers on the moon in order to allow scientists to learn more about earth's biggest natural satellite.

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  • Are blue moons actually blue?

    Q: Are blue moons actually blue?

    A:

    While the name "blue moon" conjures up a vivid, colorful image, the term actually refers to those times when there are two full moons in a single month; that second full moon is referred to as the blue moon, though its color is likely to be the same as it ever is. It is possible for the moon to have a bluish appearance, but this is usually due to atmospheric changes on earth, such as smoke or ash in the upper atmosphere as the result of fires or volcanic activity.

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  • What is the difference between the Earth and the moon?

    Q: What is the difference between the Earth and the moon?

    A:

    One of the many differences between the Earth and the moon is simply that the Earth is a planet and the moon orbits the Earth as its satellite. The Earth's circumference is 24,873.6 miles, while that of the moon is 6783.5 miles.

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  • What happens during a lunar eclipse?

    Q: What happens during a lunar eclipse?

    A:

    A lunar eclipse happens when the Earth passes between the moon and the sun. Lunar eclipses cast a shadow on the moon due to the Earth's location. From the perspective of the moon, the Earth completely blocks the sun.

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  • Do full moons really make us crazy?

    Q: Do full moons really make us crazy?

    A:

    Humans have long believed that there is a connection between a full moon and erratic behavior, but there is no scientific proof that this is the case. Even though no real evidence exists of the moon's crazy-making powers, many continue to believe that the two things are connected. This is known as "illusory correlation," in which people imagine that they see a logical connection where there isn't one.

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  • Why is the moon important?

    Q: Why is the moon important?

    A:

    Most people know that the moon's gravitational influence has an effect on the tides on Earth, but some scientists also believe that the presence of the moon played an important role in making Earth habitable to begin with. The interplay between the Earth and the moon mirrors events that occurred throughout the early solar system, as a Mars-sized object may have hit the Earth, sending some of the mantle into orbit that soon cooled into the moon. Over time, the relationship between the Earth and the moon may well have assisted the advent of life.

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